Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the unsaturated zone
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Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the unsaturated zone technical considerations : draft report for comment by

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Published by Division of Health, Siting and Waste Management, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementC.N. Ostrowski ... [et al.]
ContributionsOstrowski, C. N, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Health, Siting, and Waste Management
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 26, 6, 5 ;
Number of Pages26
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14948118M

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Focused attention by world leaders is needed to address the substantial challenges posed by disposal of spent nuclear fuel from reactors and high-level radioactive waste from processing such fuel. The biggest challenges in achieving safe and secure storage and permanent waste disposal are societal, although technical challenges : Hardcover. So today, “there are some nuclear power plants in 31 countries. More are on the way. Yet, no country on Earth has an operating high-level waste disposal facility.” As of , American taxpayers were responsible for storing a growing collection of high-level waste — 70, tons of spent fuel, canisters of military waste/5(20). Geologic Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste book. Geologic Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste. meaning that significant strain is accumulated in the few intersecting major fracture zones without creating any open space where high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is stored. An important difficulty in proper location of both MR and Author: Roland Pusch, Raymond N. Yong, Masashi Nakano. Winograd (,) proposed placing nuclear waste in the unsaturated zone and recently sum- marized the advhtages associated with using the thick unsaturated zones of the southwestern United States as potential environments for the disposal of solidified radioactive wastes, with par- ticular emphasis on shallow burial ( feet) ofCited by:

Winograd (, ) proposed placing nuclear waste in the unsaturated zone and recently sum­ marized the advantages associated with using the thick unsaturated zones of the southwestern United States as potential environments for the disposal of solidified radioactive wastes, with par­ ticular emphasis on shallow burial ( feet) ofCited by: for developing permanent disposal facilities for high-level nuclear wastes have been aimed at plac-ing such facilities in the saturated zone. However, the concept of a repository in the unsaturated zone above the water table now has begun to receive serious attention. The site being considered for the. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste can be disposed in deep horizontal drillholes in sedimentary, metamorphic or igneous rocks. Horizontal drillhole disposal has safety, operational and economic benefits: the repository is deep in the brine-saturated zone far below aquifers in a reducing environment of formations that can be shown to have been isolated from the surface for Cited by: 1. The disposal of high-level radioactive waste: I. What is high-level radioactive waste? The term high-level radioactive waste (HLW) generally refers to the highly radioactive wastes requiring permanent isolation from man's environment that arise as a byproduct of nuclear power generation. In countries where the spent nuclear fuel arising from.

  Locating a repository in the unsaturated zone of arid regions eliminates or simplifies many of the technological problems involved in designing a repository for operation below the water table and predicting its performance. It also offers possible accessibility and ease of monitoring throughout the operational period and possible retrieval of waste long by: disposal of high-level radioactive waste, and the interest earned on the resulting funds, totaled $26 billion through DOE had spent $ billion of these funds on its. the solidification of high-level wastes and evaluation of solidified high-level waste products. A Technical Committee also prepared a technical report on conditioning of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Technical information from these latter activities, in particular, provide much of the basis for the content of this report. The focus is on deep geological disposal, appropriate for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), reprocessed high-level waste (HLW), and long-lived, intermediate level waste (LL/ILW). Many of the principles discussed here, however, equally apply to near-surface disposal of lower activity wastes.